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Upcoming Events. No scheduled events. Add an event. Quotes by Susan Campbell. Your work is done, because you have carefully created a herd of women who know and even begrudgingly accept that their place is secondary, just outside the limelight, clapping for and cheering on the important people who were never taught to put others first.

well told

But REAL confidence comes from accepting yourself as you are, and sharing the real you. When you share you do so simply in the interest of being transparent and not trying to get a certain favorable response. Letting go of trying to control other peoples' responses to you is one of the greatest confidence-builders I know of. And from my own experience, I have come to the conclusion that I am most lovable when I am most transparent.

Topics Mentioning This Author. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Rate this book Clear rating 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars.

Want to Read saving Error rating book. Walled Kitchen Gardens 3. Frog Hollow: Stories from an American Neighborhood 3. What does that tell you? I think her branch was a bit more liberal than mine, though, because we did not knock doors or do outreach, but I understand that the church I attended later employed some of the same tactics the bus stories cracked me up.

I I grew up in the Church of Christ - the same "denomination" that Campbell did. I loved Campbell's honesty and humor, although to those firmly ensconced in the CoC would likely find it offensive. I envy her ability to separate God from the religion she was born into - someday, I hope to do the same. Apr 17, Nick rated it it was amazing. Apr 25, Ana Mardoll rated it liked it Shelves: ana-reviewed. I was instantly charmed by the first few chapters of "Dating Jesus", as Campbell tells her life story and I recognize so much of myself and my own past in her story.

Her writing style is folksy and flows nicely, and so much of her writing reminds me intimately of my own history particularly counting the wood-knots during the countless sermons she sits through.

As the book advances, however, the biographical parts become more and more broken up with feminist history, and often in such a meandering tone that I wish this book had been more rigorously edited. Campbell breaks narrative frequently and often to say, basically, "I can't believe I just wrote that, that makes me sound bad, haha! Much of the feminist history presented here is interesting and important, but as it is not filtered through the lens of the biography format "I felt that Susan B.

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I respect Campbell immensely, and I am sure she means no offense, but she should not use her book to repeat the old canard that Jesus was a "rebel rabbi" because he didn't treat women like dirt when all the other contemporary Jewish teachers did because the Bible seems to say so.

Actual scholars like Robert Price have painstakingly pointed out that many of the rabbis of Jesus' day did NOT subscribe to the literal interpretation of the Hebrew law that Christians claim Jesus was 'rebelling' against, and it verges on anti-Semitism to continue to spread mis-truths about a culture just because you can't be bothered to research the issue outside of a single, competing religious text.

Jesus - if he existed, and if the writings we have of him truly reflect his teachings - was awesome enough on his own without flanderizing his contemporaries into caricatures for him to out-perform. Furthermore, claims regarding Biblical authorship and early church timelines should be made by actual scholars and historians, not former Bible Quiz Masters. Disregarding the non-scholarly material regarding Biblical history and authorship, there is a lot here that is interesting, but the format feels awkward and forced.

I wish the feminism information had been framed less in a 'textbook format' "Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote 'The Woman's Bible' indiscuss. The jumps from biography how Campbell feels about church, boyfriends, and brothers to history with very little bridge in-between creates the impression that Campbell does not really remember how she felt, or perhaps does not know how she feels now, but I would much prefer to read Campbell's piecing together of her likely childhood response to this marriage of her holy Bible and her intuitive feminism, as opposed to the novel equivalent of a Wikipedia page with dates and quotes and factoids.

I wanted very much to like "Dating Jesus", but by the end of the book I was left with the impression that Campbell didn't have as much to say on her childhood as I wanted to read. The biography sections are superb, the historical sections are dry but probably factual, the Biblical sections are marked with that fundamentalist blindness that believes Biblical study should occur in a vacuum - beginning and ending only with the 'approved' Bible books, and nothing else - but the assortment as a whole fails to mesh, and ends up feeling like three short books wedged uncomfortably into one.

Mar 01, Florinda rated it liked it. Despite the fact I haven't been a regular churchgoer for several years - or maybe because of it - I still find religion a fascinating subject.

I'm interested in both academic-style discussion of religious topics and personal accounts of experience with organized religion, especially struggles with it. I'm pretty sure that ten years of living in the Bible Belt contribute to a particular curiosity about fundamentalist beliefs and practices, and my own issues as a woman living within Catholicism Despite the fact I haven't been a regular churchgoer for several years - or maybe because of it - I still find religion a fascinating subject.

I'm pretty sure that ten years of living in the Bible Belt contribute to a particular curiosity about fundamentalist beliefs and practices, and my own issues as a woman living within Catholicism draw me toward other women's stories of their own religious issues. Susan Campbell's Dating Jesus brings two of those lines of interest together. Campbell is a journalist with the Hartford Courant, and her book, subtitled A Memoir of Fundamentalism, Feminism, and the American Girl, is a little different than I expected - lighter on the memoir, and heavier on history and analysis connecting fundamentalist teachings about women's roles and the feminist movement in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Campbell's approach is thematic rather than strictly chronological, and she usually places the events she shares from her personal history into a larger context.

Regardless of the emphasis, however, it was a pretty quick read, and accessible and thought-provoking throughout. Well, thought-provoking for me, anyway, but I've already said this is an area I think about quite a bit. Campbell's family became members of a fundamentalist church in Missouri when her mother married her stepfather, and young Susan initially embraced it wholeheartedly, Bible reading, outreach ministry, and all.

However, as she grew into her teens and young adulthood in the 's under the influence of second-wave feminism, she began to question the restrictive roles that her church demanded of women - but she came from a background that didn't encourage questioning. Certainty, rooted in the belief in the literal truth of the Bible, is one of the hallmarks of fundamentalist thought.

On that note, I found the distinctions Campbell makes between fundamentalism and evangelical Christianity enlightening; not coming from either tradition, I've tended to lump them together. Campbell spent several years as an adult studying at the Hartford Seminary in Connecticut, and calls herself a "seeker" these days. She is without a "church home" now, and seems to have mixed feelings about that. She has re-framed some of her understanding about Christianity and women though direct reference to verses about Jesus' interactions with women in the Gospels themselves, which seem to be much more woman-friendly than a lot of "official" Christian teaching, and seems to see some hope in a renewed emphasis on "social ministry" by some congregations.

I think I had expected the balance between personal and political in this book to be different, but I still found it a worthwhile read. Feb 24, Emily rated it really liked it. I spent the first part of this book wishing I could bring myself to highlight in books that are not textbooks. I want to hand this book to my husband with the parts relevant to my own childhood pointed out with highlighter. I want to laugh and also cry at how similar my life was to the author's.

Campbell's anecdotes are funny, poignant, and most importantly, allegorical. As I start the sixth chapter, I become less enchanted with the book. It seems we've slipped from humorous-memoir-with-a-message I spent the first part of this book wishing I could bring myself to highlight in books that are not textbooks. It seems we've slipped from humorous-memoir-with-a-message to non-fiction discussion of the history of women with regard to religion.

It is all very interesting, but mostly cribbed from other texts on the same subject with much less relation to the author's life. The memoir gets back on track with Chapter Eight, relating to Campbell's experience on the homecoming court, and high school dating experiences.

Again, excellent work. Then, inexplicably, the next chapter skips to a time after the author has grown up, had kids, divorced, and re-married. What happened in between there? Isn't that what we're reading this for? How did Susan go from that repressed child in a fundamentalist church to the feminist journalist she is today? How did that happen? I am desperate to know. Her final chapters, on social Christianity and the true message of Jesus, while understandably important, also seem divergent from earlier themes.

Possibly this information could have been the fodder for Campbell's next book instead of being squeezed into this one? Certainly the topics deserve further treatment. I would very much like to read an entire text by this author just on the topic of social work as done by the Christian community.

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Overall, however, I really enjoyed the book. I felt that it was well-researched and well-written. The anecdotes especially had a very funny, engaging style. The parts of the book that seemed to be a collection of quotes by other authors were at least organized well and added to the point that was being conveyed.

I loved the first few chapters of Dating Jesus: A Story of Fundamentalism, Feminism, and the American Girl, in which the author told of her growing up years in the Church of Christ. I think Susan Campbell and I share more than a first name, because many of her recollections were very familiar to me (and hilariously written, I might add)/5. A blog companion to the book by Susan Campbell. Dating Jesus. A blog companion to the book by Susan Campbell The link between poverty and (mis)education. When it comes to economic inequality, and the cycle of poverty, I have been researching at my internship (New Have n Reads) how the lack of proper education contributes to the cycle of. While it may be true that Jesus loves all of us, Susan Campbell is clearly His favorite. Her writing cuts to the quick and slices to the bone, thereby cleaning and healing old wounds for every woman who's struggled to find acceptance within, and without, conventional religion.

I'd recommend this book to any recovering [insert your denomination here], with again, my wish that the time between Campbell's childhood and later adulthood were covered more fully.

Apr 17, Pica rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Everyone with an interest in religion and feminism. Shelves: non-fichistoryfeminismreligion. I don't know if I can express how much I enjoyed and appreciated this book. I've been doing a lot of non-fiction reading lately, and a number of authors are clearly writing because they have a bone to pick.

I don't feel that that is at all true of this book. Campbell grew up attending the fundamentalist church of Christ in Missouri. It was the sort of place that didn't allow musical instruments for their hymns, because they aren't mentioned in the Bible. Campbell was a staunch believer, and I don't know if I can express how much I enjoyed and appreciated this book. Campbell was a staunch believer, and completely involved in her church, but she was also a life-loving little girl who loved baseball more than anything else apart from Jesus and didn't understand why her year-old brother was allowed to preach when women were forbidden to do so.

She speaks of her early life with more nostalgia than anger, even though she has since left the church of her youth. Over the course of this book, she gives a very even-handed account of what she was taught, and of how she came to believe something different as an adult, even though she could never entirely shake off her fundamentalist upbringing.

She also offers a short history of the Evangelical and Feminist movements in America, and how they were not always at odds with one another. And there is an especially beautiful chapter where she discusses how Jesus' interaction with women is completely at odds with the complementarianism preached by many Evangelical churches.

This is a beautiful memoir. Insightful, intelligent, moving, and occasionally very funny. A sincere, but not rose-tinted, view of fundamentalism from the inside.

Highly recommended to everyone from atheists to Evangelicals. Mar 23, A. This book wasn't exactly what I was expecting, though I'm not entirely sure what I did think it was going to be.

Still, the combination of a history of some cts of American evangelicalism coupled with stories about the early American feminists, interwoven with Campbell's own experiences in a fundamentalist church was extremely interesting. I found it helpful partly because it aided me in parsing out some of the things I encountered when I spent a couple years at a church of Christ high This book wasn't exactly what I was expecting, though I'm not entirely sure what I did think it was going to be.

I found it helpful partly because it aided me in parsing out some of the things I encountered when I spent a couple years at a church of Christ high school - my brother and I were the only Lutherans attending the school, so we tended to get people staring at us when we mentioned how we did Communion or the way our pastors wore vestments, and we found ourselves confused by some of the theological assertions we ran into. Knowing some of the history of that branch of the church helps me understand some of the things that happened there, including the way boys tended to be catered to and girls were not.

Campbell's discussion on feminism and the church included ideas that I was not new to, but she provided a slightly different perspective than some of the ones I have encountered, and I truly appreciated what she had to say. Over this last year, we left a church where women were only permitted in leadership in limited ways, for the Anglican church, and I still remember the first Sunday there, when I realized how much I had been longing to know I was welcomed as an equal by the church, and how much I'd been ignoring the pain of knowing that my words were counted as less by the synod of our old church, and that day, when I received the Eucharist from a woman, I felt myself starting to heal.

Oct 22, Susan rated it liked it. I think Susan Campbell and I share more than a first name, because many of her recollections were very familiar to me and hilariously written, I might add.

Campbell and her family were in church every time the door was open, and she was a Bible Bowl Champion. However, even as she listened attentively to the preacher I loved the first few chapters of Dating Jesus: A Story of Fundamentalism, Feminism, and the American Girl, in which the author told of her growing up years in the Church of Christ.

However, even as she listened attentively to the preacher and her Sunday School teachers and knocked on doors for Jesus, she had her doubts - principally because of the second-class treatment of women in the church. In what's becoming predictable in my latest reads, Campbell ends up leaving the church and becoming enlightened, i.

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Yes, I should have quit with this one while I was ahead, but I felt compelled to continue. Campbell recounts a visit to Haiti in one chapter, where she decries the fact that "my country has played a major role in helping destroy this country. Never mind the incredible generosity of Americans - the goods we send to all kinds of countries, the kids we sponsor and adopt - never mind all that.

You know, reading things like this really helps me understand why some people were so happy about Obama's election. They truly do seem to feel like America needs to apologize. Anyway, off-topic I know, but I enjoyed Campbell's memoirs before she became enlightened. In short - I liked her better as a Church of Christ member! I recommend the first half of this book. Mar 06, Rebecca rated it really liked it.

OK, I'm admittedly giving this an amazing review and I've only just started the book. The title itself gave me such high expectations that for the last few days, I've just been staring at it lovingly. Then yesterday, I told my partner, "There's no way this book is going to live up to my expectations. I don't even want to start it. It's witty, humorous, and yet earnest. While my growing up experience was not nearly as fundamentalist, it explores some OK, I'm admittedly giving this an amazing review and I've only just started the book.

While my growing up experience was not nearly as fundamentalist, it explores some eerily similar experiences and questions. Now that I've finished the book, I still give it high reviews. The honesty with which Campbell explores the tango between her faith and her feminism is refreshing.

She doesn't condemn one and turn to the other for redemption. Rather, she wrestles with each and messily so. I liked the historical context in which she placed her story. I also liked the way that she left her struggle unresolved at the end. Her story seemed more human that way. I docked my rating to 4 stars because at times, I felt like her reflections could have used a couple more rounds of revision.

Sometimes, she repeated parts of the same story, or awkwardly jumped back and forth between events.

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Apr 27, Candace rated it liked it Shelves: spiritualityautobiographywomen-by-or-aboutmy-ebooks. My only real problem with this book was my own expectations. The book was recommended to me as being "very funny," and so I expected a rollicking autobiography about growing up in a particular Protestant faith.

The actual book is very good, but I would not describe it as funny. It has a few droll moments, but mostly it's a report on the still-unhealed war wounds of a woman who grew up in the midst of both religious and gender-related social wars.

Topics Mentioning This Author

She puts in many more Biblical references than I My only real problem with this book was my own expectations. She puts in many more Biblical references than I needed I wasn't about to look them up - and so they came across more as a kind of bragging about her extensive knowledge of the Good Bookand many footnotes that felt out of place in a popular as opposed to academic book.

And at points, it became didactic, sharing information about the history of the US and religion in America, etc. Overall, the book never quite gelled for me. It seemed to meander a bit, like a string of collected essays more than a coherent work. On the other hand, I feel as though I gained a new perspective on religious groups that interpret the Bible literally. And once I finally got into her rhythm, I enjoyed her voice. All in all, not a great book, but not a bad one.

Dec 19, Sarah rated it liked it Shelves: permanent-collectionmemoir-autobiographyreligion-occult.

Dating Jesus: A Story of Fundamentalism, Feminism, and the American Girl The title "Dating Jesus" elicit images which are seemingly counter-intuitive to one who is a-religious and fortunately, that is where the expectation ends; at the title/5(29). Susan Campbell is the author of Dating Jesus ( avg rating, ratings, 95 reviews, published ), Saying What's Real ( avg rating, ratings /5. Susan Campbell teaches at Central Connecticut State University, and at Manchester Community College. She is also the author of "Dating Jesus: Fundamentalism, Feminism, .

I definitely related to some of this. The author writes about growing up in the church of Christ, in Missouri in the s. She was a natural born feminist, not understanding the rules that limited women from preaching, or being a bigger part of the church.

She grew up in a church that taught you that God could come back at any moment, and you'd better be right with God at all times. This is the part that I most identified with, as well as the idea that Jesus was a person who I had an intimate I definitely related to some of this. This is the part that I most identified with, as well as the idea that Jesus was a person who I had an intimate relationship with.

I tended to see him as a loving uncle, while she saw him as her godly boyfriend.

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Her church didn't take with laying on of hands or prophesying, while mine did. We had a church band and we danced in the aisiles, raising our hands to Jesus, while her church didn't allow any musical instruments or dancing. Interesting that she grew up in the south, while I grew up in northern NY.

It's the difference between her less pentecostal church, and my very pentecostal one. Some sections did drag a bit, as she went into the history of the christian churches in the early s, and some of the writing got a bit dry.

But overall it's a good memoir of growing up with Jesus, and finding your feminist roots, and coming out a bit scathed, but none the worse for wear. Nov 24, Marie rated it really liked it Shelves: memoirsnonfictionspirituality-religion. Oct 12, AJ rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction, memoir-and-biography. Very fascinating - half memoir, half feminist look at the bible, Jesus and Christianity.

Jan 26, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: non-fictionunowned-and-rea religionmemoirs-biographiessex-sexuality-gender. Very readable, conversational, great use of footnotes. Maybe a bit dated published inbut seems to have been written inand jumps straight from her adolescence to her life as she was writing.

Dating Jesus: A Story of Fundamentalism, Feminism, and the American Girl

I think its a solid spiritual autobiography. May 02, Jennifer rated it really liked it Shelves: religion. This memoir is a sincere and honest account of the author's experience growing up in and grappling with the church of Christ. Campbell's story weaves together the threads of her fervor, disillusionment, and ultimately her sense of being "Christ-haunted. I agree with other reviewers that while the first half of the book flies by smoothly, the second half becomes a bit disjointed as Campbell attempts to understand her own life in the context of feminist history.

Nevertheless, it's an interesting and illuminating story and a very fair account of what it's like and what it means to be a fundamentalist Christian in America. Apr 15, Priscilla Herrington rated it it was amazing. Susan Campbell a journalist and columnist for The Hartford Courant, but before she arrived in Hartford, Connecticut, she was a little girl growing up ion a fundamentalist Christian household in Missouri.

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Dating Jesus is a memoir of Campbell's life and her movement away from the church of her childhood. It is also a thoughtful consideration of what she was taught as a child such as, that women must be silent in church, and that homosexuality is wrong and her own conclusions based on her study Susan Campbell a journalist and columnist for The Hartford Courant, but before she arrived in Hartford, Connecticut, she was a little girl growing up ion a fundamentalist Christian household in Missouri.

It is also a thoughtful consideration of what she was taught as a child such as, that women must be silent in church, and that homosexuality is wrong and her own conclusions based on her study of the Bible and the writings of women theologians. Campbell describes her love for Jesus and the church, and then her irritation and eventual anger that, as a female, he was expected to quietly take a back seat. She moves from anger to a place of forgiveness, where she can enjoy listening to, and singing, the old gospel hymns of her childhood, and where she understands Jesus as a very different entity from the image she carried as a child.

Dating jesus susan campbell

I enjoyed Dating Jesus and learned about a denomination that I was not familiar with. But more than that, I was impressed with Campbell's theological discussion of the meaning of Genesis stories, and of the recorded behavior and words of Jesus. Dec 30, Rebecka rated it liked it Shelves: feminismreligionnon-fiction.

When Love Hurts: (Part 1 of 8) Why We Fear Intimacy - Susan Campbell

For the most part,I enjoyed this book. I was somewhat disappointed in the imbalance of topic- I thought there would be more memoir and less theology. I felt I could relate to the author on many levels, having been raised fundamental Baptist.

There were indeed some parts where I knew exactly where she was coming from, but I couldn't relate to her struggle to make it all fit together. In my own experience, if a puzzle is missing pieces or has other pieces mixed in with it, I don't bother working For the most part,I enjoyed this book.

In my own experience, if a puzzle is missing pieces or has other pieces mixed in with it, I don't bother working on the puzzle. It may be worthwhile to explore the attitudes of Jesus and the early church regarding women. But in the end, it's not going to change behavior or teachings, particularly in the fundamental and evangelical movements.

Another problem with this book was the layout, which at times seemed scattered between themes. At times some stories didn't seem to fit in or relate to her general thesis. While the chapter regarding her trip to Haiti was moving, I didn't understand how that experience fit in with the rest of the book. Feb 04, Alana rated it liked it. I read a lot of the reviews on this book and I agreed with a few, the writing isn't like other journalist's takes on fundamentalism I grew up Southern Baptist and while we weren't quite as strict, most of Campbell's attitudes about gender roles and religious mores rang really, really true for me.

I thought the writing at the end was better than the writing at the beginning and I wish I could get I read a lot of the reviews on this book and I agreed with a few, the writing isn't like other journalist's takes on fundamentalism I thought the writing at the end was better than the writing at the beginning and I wish I could get the women written about in Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement to read this and get a glimpse of what their lives could be about.

I'm glad I read this book and I'd recommend it to others who are interested in religion, fundamentalism, feminist theory or other related topics. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Readers also enjoyed. Biography Memoir. About Susan Campbell. Susan Campbell. Books by Susan Campbell. We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. To create our lis Read more No trivia or quizzes yet. Quotes from Dating Jesus: A S Your work is done, because you have carefully created a herd of women who know and even begrudgingly accept that their place is secondary, just outside the limelight, clapping for and cheering on the important people who were never taught to put others first.

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The idea that Christians could and should effect social change on a large scale appeared, to some, to smack of theocracy, a blending they could not countenance. The notion of separation began to take hold; fundamentalists within the evangelical movement found themselves focusing more on Jesus's intended return to earth, and they began to view what they saw as society's ills as the scriptural fulfillment of the last days.

To try to improve the world was to risk moving into the distance the day of Jesus's triumphant return. Welcome back.



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3 Comments

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